Manawaker Studio update Aug 2016

Readers, fans, contributors, and collaborators,

It’s been eight months since the last update roundup from Manawaker Studio. I hope this note finds you well. I know you’re busy; I’ll try to keep it quick.

Starward I Cover front webThe big news that prompted this update is the release of Starward Tales, Manawaker Studio’s latest anthology. My biased opinion is that it came out rather nicely. It’s full of great stories, poems, and visual art depicting sci-fi interpretations of classic stories by a great group of talented creators.Pick it up in paperback or Kindle over on Amazon.

The response to the Starward Tales submission call generated so many great submissions that there will be a second volume next year, for which submissions have just opened. If great things continue to roll in for this call, then it might become an annual collection, which would be rad.

Rattleback Skies featureIf you haven’t noticed it yet, a new weekly feature has appeared on Manawaker’s blog in the last few months. Recycled Comics is a project in which I’m taking old (public domain) comic books,  removing all the words, and then putting my own words in to tell a new story. The first arc, “Rattleback Skies” will be concluding next week, and a new one will begin soon after. You can check them all out here. A bit hard to read since they’re just posted as blog entries. Creating a proper interface for the comics is on my to-do list.

Recycled Comics only exists because of my fabulous Patreon patrons. If you don’t know about it yet, Patreon is a place where fans can help me create cool new stuff by setting up monthly support. In exchange, patrons get access to a special content feed, and certain tiers of support also get a subscription to Manawaker books. If you miss Flash Fiction Fridays, you can read them over there on the patron feed for just 1$/month.

Patrons are also partly responsible for the great Flash Fiction Podcast, which is now 30 episodes into the first season, featuring a new flash fiction story every Thursday, and you don’t need to be a Patron to enjoy it. You can listen each week on the Manawaker blog,  iTunes, Google Music, or even YouTube.

In the last update I mentioned that Dragon Line would soon be available to play online at Boardgameareana.com. The project hit some roadblocks in the first part of this year when the game was about 95% finished, and the end result is that the game now has a new developer, and work has picked back up after months of stalled progress, though much of the previous work has to be done again. Keep an eye on the Manawaker blog for news of the release. Hopefully, sooner than later.

Thank you for your time, and your interest in Manawaker Studio.

Cheers,

CB

Recycled Comics: Rattleback Skies – Page 6-1

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Note: While it seems Jansen was waxing philosophical here, he was really just reiterating lessons he learned as a child. Solar Society at this time was dominated by the philosophy of The Universal Commons, basically an upholding of the ideals of Accountable Socialism in nearly all aspects of life. Children were taught early that no one owned any idea privately. Scientist and artists were supported by The Commons, and once an idea was made manifest, it always belonged to The Commons.

Recycled Comics is supported by Patrons on Patreon. Want to help me make even more nifty things? Become a patron, today!

Recycled Comics: Rattleback Skies – Page 5-3

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Note: Though only the most wealthy could afford interplanetary trips, cruising remained a popular vacation choice even deep into the quantum age. On Mars, these cruise liners were slow, high-capacity dirigibles. Popular ports-of-call included Historical Mars City, College Station, Nouveau Paris, Cattown, and North Polar Cap Systemic Parklands (“NoCap Park” to the locals).

Patron Short Fiction: The Dream Miner’s Drill


“You’re an old one,” he whispered with a small smile, “probably got some interesting stuff in there.” He lined up his flenser on the glass of the pod, and squeezed the actuator. The device made a soft purring sound, as it carved its tiny hole through the glass. “Maybe you’re holding on to the secret to a long-forgotten acuity, or perhaps you were witness to some historically significant events.” he licked his lips. “Let’s find out.” The flenser ceased its noise, and Grel closed his eyes, concentrating on the link that he needed to form.


Get the rest of this story, and dozens of others, by becoming a patron on Patron.

Recycled Comics: Rattleback Skies – page 5-2

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Note: Part of the Science Minister’s odd non-official power on Mars was that the position was given full administrative access to all research projects on the planet. Ostensibly, this was a sign of respect and trust in the office, and was often cited as a very good reason to be very careful about who was chosen for the role. On paper, the Minister could, at his whim, enter into any lab on the planet, access any computer designated for research, and see all pertinent data on all projects, with only the fact of his position as passcode. In reality however, locked doors and politics kept the minister from truly having access to everything.

Recycled Comics is supported by patrons on Patreon!

Patron Flash Fiction: The Lone and Level Sands

Earthlings,

We regret that you are too late.

You call this a “first contact mission” and I understand your excitement, I assure you. We have ancient records detailing the importance of such events. You have not, however, contacted a previously-unknown-to-you race of sentient beings. We hope you are not too disappointed.


Get the rest ofthe story over on the Patreon!

Recycled Comics: Rattleback Skies – Page 5-1

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Note: All transport vehicles of this period had sophisticated automatic piloting systems which were thousands of times safer and more efficient than human pilots. However, it would be several hundred years before a certain type of machismo – which insisted that human pilots were ‘better’ – faded from the human psyche. It was a popular saying among human pilots that they “would rather die at the controls than live under autopilot”. Hundreds of such wishes came true every year, while rates of death as a direct result of autopilot error were statistically insignificant.

Recycled Comics is supported by our patrons on Patreon.

Patron Flash Fiction – The Suited Prince


As he approached the airlock, he heard a voice, “I can help you” it said.

A creature stepped into his path, it was a large chicken with steel feathers and a sword beak. It was menacing in appearance, but not threatening. “Your legs, your lungs, your heart,” the chicken said, “I can fix them for you.”

“What do you want in return?” the prince asked, knowing that nothing was ever given freely by strangers.


Get the rest of the story over on the patreon page.